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Trails & Gardens
are open
dawn to dusk

1710 House
open by
appointment

Please respect
tenant privacy.
Thank you!

Hike the Trails on Our Conservation Land

Situated behind the Weeks Brick House are approximately 30 acres of conservation land, through which pass several well-marked walking trails. They are accessible off of Tide Mill Road (beyond the Weeks Ave. road to the house), where there is a small parking area. The trails are open all year, from dawn to dusk. We strongly recommend that in the late fall, both you and your pets wear orange. Please note that powered vehicles and any other activities (i.e. dumping, greens harvesting, fires, etc. --- we're watching!) which destroy the grounds are strictly prohibited. For a detailed Trail Map, click here.

New! Listen to the WBH Audio Tour as you walk the trails!

Now you can meander along our trails and listen to our new WBH Trails Audio Tour. The audio tour is available via a convenient link through our web site for compatible portable devices. The 14-minute audio tour corresponds to points along the hiking trails on our conservation land, and also references the Week family farmstead history. The tour can be paused at any time so walkers can enjoy the trails --- and the audio tour --- at their own pace.

The audio tour was conceived, researched, and written by museum professional and WBH board member Nicola Astles. (Other credits: Landscape analysis - Garret D. Langlois, Ph.D. candidate in Ecology, Louisiana State University; narration and sound production - Michael Freeman; music performed by the U.S. Air Force Band.) Go straight to the WBH Trails Audio Tour here.


The Conservation Easement: A worthy goal realized

In order to forever protect and preserve open space, in 1992 the Weeks Brick House conveyed a conservation easement to the Town of Greenland and the State of New Hampshire. This easement encompasses approximately 30 acres of the original family farmstead behind the Brick House, primarily bounded by the Winnicut River and Tide Mill Road. This property includes open meadow, hardwoods, and a pine stand; and its use is limited to farming, timbering, and recreation. In 2000 several town agencies, individuals, the UNH Cooperative Extension, and the local Boy Scouts collaborated to design and construct a network of trails for public use, as well as plan for long-term management.

A small parking area was cleared off Tide Mill Road, and selective clearing began, with the goal of promoting wildlife habitat restoration. Volunteer labor from the Boy Scouts and others laid out the trails and constructed footbridges over seasonally wet areas. In September 2001 a ribbon-cutting ceremony officially opened the trails, which have been enjoyed by so many visitors from near and far in the ensuing years.

In addition to frequent use by those in our community, the trails provide visiting Weeks family descendants with the opportunity to quite literally walk in the footsteps of their ancestors.